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Suggestions for a Good Night's Sleep

Sleep Disorders

We all look forward to a good night's sleep. Getting enough sleep and sleeping well help us stay healthy. Many older people do not enjoy a good night's sleep on a regular basis. They have trouble falling or staying asleep. Sleep patterns change as we age, but disturbed sleep and waking up tired every day is not part of normal aging. In fact, troubled sleep may be a sign of emotional or physical disorders and something you should talk about with a doctor or sleep specialist.

Sleep and Aging

There are two kinds of sleep in a normal sleep cycle - rapid eye movement or dreaming sleep (REM) and quiet sleep (non-REM). Everyone has about four or five cycles of REM and non-REM sleep a night. For older people, the amount of time spent in the deepest stages of non-REM sleep decreases. This may explain why older people are thought of as light sleepers. Although the amount of sleep each person needs varies widely, the average range is between 7 and 8 hours a nig...More

Fast Facts: Learn! Fast!

What Sleep Disorders are there?

  • All Sleep Disorders involve daytime stress and trouble with work, school or daily activities because of sleep problems during the night.
  • People with a sleep disorder often have depression, anxiety, trouble thinking, remembering or learning information that need to be treated along with the particular sleep problem.
  • Ongoing sleep issues like insomnia (trouble falling asleep) or excessive (too much) sleeping can lead to other mental health problems, so getting help is important if you suffer from these conditions.
  • There are 10 Sleep Disorders:
    • Insomnia Disorder - having trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or going back to sleep after waking up.
    • Hypersomnolence Disorder - being really sleepy even though you slept at least 7 hours at a time
    • Narcolepsy - being unable to resist going to sleep or taking a nap
    • Breathing-Related Sleep Disorders - this includes 3 issues:
      • Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea - the person takes involuntary pauses in breathing during sleep where air cannot flow in or out of their nose or mouth. This causes them to be very tired during the day.
      • Central Sleep Apnea - when the brain doesn't send the right signals to start the breathing muscles during sleep, which causes the person to temporarily stop breathing.
      • Sleep-Related Hypoventilation - the person has decreased breathing and leads to an increase in blood carbon dioxide (CO2) levels.
    • Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder - disruptions in a person's cycle of sleeping and being awake. This often happens because of a work schedule (for example, working overnight and sleeping during the day) that results in being very tired and sleeping a lot, having trouble going to or staying asleep (insomnia) or both.
    • Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) Sleep Arousal Disorders - the person has either Sleepwalking or Sleep Terrors while sleeping.
    • Nightmare Disorder - repeated and long dreams that usually involve trying to avoid threats to survival or physical safety.
    • Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Behavior Disorder - repeated episodes of vocalization (loud talking, yelling or screaming) and/or complex motor behaviors (kicking, punching, jumping out of bed, etc.) while asleep.
    • Restless Legs Syndrome - an urge to move the legs during rest or inactivity due to uncomfortable or unpleasant sensations in the legs (a "pins and needles" type of feeling or crawling, tingling, burning or itching sensations).
    • Substance/Medication-Induced Sleep Disorder - severe problems with sleep that started during or soon after using too much of a substance or while trying to stop using it. This could include alcohol, caffeine, sedatives, opioids, stimulants, cocaine, tobacco, or other medications.

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What are some tips for getting a good night's sleep?

  • Follow a regular schedule - go to sleep and get up at the same time. Try not to nap too much during the day - you might be less sleepy at night.
  • Try to exercise at regular times each day.
  • Try to get some natural light in the afternoon each day.
  • Be careful about what you eat. Don't drink beverages with caffeine late in the day. Caffeine is a stimulant and can keep you awake. Also, if you like a snack before bed, a warm beverage and a few crackers may help.
  • Don't drink alcohol or smoke cigarettes to help you sleep. Even small amounts of alcohol can make it harder to stay asleep. Smoking is dangerous for many reasons including the hazard of falling asleep with a lit cigarette. The nicotine in cigarettes is also a stimulant.
  • Create a safe and comfortable place to sleep. Make sure there are locks on all doors and smoke alarms on each floor. A lamp that's easy to turn on and a phone by your bed may be helpful. The room should be dark, well ventilated, and as quiet as possible.
  • Develop a bedtime routine. Do the same things each night to tell your body that it's time to wind down. Some people watch the evening news, read a book, or soak in a warm bath.
  • Use your bedroom only for sleeping. After turning off the light, give yourself about 15 minutes to fall asleep. If you are still awake and not drowsy, get out of bed. When you get sleepy, go back to bed.
  • Try not to worry about your sleep. Some people find that playing mental games is helpful. For example, think black - a black cat on a black velvet pillow on a black corduroy sofa, etc.; or tell yourself it's 5 minutes before you have to get up and you're just trying to get a few extra winks.

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News Articles

  • Sleep Deprivation a Big Drain on the Brain

    If you feel like you can't think straight after a sleepless night, new research suggests you are not imagining things. More...

  • Three Tips for Getting Your Zzzzzz's

    Many Americans aren't getting a solid seven hours of sleep a night, putting them at risk for diabetes, heart disease and obesity. But it's the brain that needs a good night's sleep the most, according to Dr. Randall Wright, a neurologist at Houston Methodist Hospital. More...

  • Screening Truckers for Sleep Apnea Cuts Health Insurance Costs

    Requiring drivers to get treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) saved a trucking company a large amount in insurance costs for other health conditions, a new study shows. More...

  • Sleep Apnea Linked to Diabetic Eye Disease

    Severe sleep apnea is a risk factor for diabetic eye disease that can lead to vision loss and blindness, researchers report. More...

  • For Insomniacs, Sleep Aids Can Ease a Troubled Mind

    People with severe insomnia may find that a sedative helps them sleep and banishes thoughts of suicide, a new study suggests. More...

  • 12 More
    • Health Tip: Solutions for Snoring

      Snoring occurs when the upper airways become narrow, says Harvard Medical School. As a result, airflow is disrupted, making tissues vibrate and produce the snoring noise. More...

    • How Sleep Woes May Strain Your Heart

      If you spend a lot of nights watching the clock instead of sleeping, new research suggests you may need to be as concerned about your heart health as you are about lost shut-eye. More...

    • Health Tip: Getting Back to Sleep

      Waking up in the middle of the night is a surefire way to disrupt the next day's activities. More...

    • Does Taking Screens Away Help Sleep-Deprived Teens?

      Cutting teens' evening screen time can improve their sleep in just one week, a new study finds. More...

    • Women With Sleep Apnea May Have Higher Cancer Odds Than Men

      Some people with sleep apnea have an increased risk of cancer, and the odds may be higher for women than men, researchers say. More...

    • AHA News: The Often-Overlooked Connection Between Sleep Troubles and Stroke

      More than 50 percent of stroke survivors are estimated to have some type of sleep problem, yet few get formally tested, in part because of "the lack of awareness" among stroke providers, according to the review published Thursday in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. More...

    • Common Sleep Myths Endanger Public Health

      Mistaken beliefs about sleep are common and pose a significant health threat, a new study warns. More...

    • CPAP Brings Longer Life for Obese People With Sleep Apnea: Study

      There's good news for the millions of obese Americans with sleep apnea: Researchers report the use of the CPAP mask may greatly increase their chances for a longer life. More...

    • Sleep Apnea May Be Linked With Alzheimer's Marker

      Millions of Americans are left drowsy each day by sleep apnea, and new research suggests it might also raise their odds for Alzheimer's disease. More...

    • Insomnia May Be in Your Genes

      Can't sleep at night? Perhaps genetics is to blame. More...

    • Sleep Apnea Patients Who Are Drowsy During the Day at Risk for Heart Woes

      People who suffer from sleep apnea and are very tired during the day may be more likely to develop heart disease, a new study finds. More...

    • Kicking, Punching: Who's at Risk for a Violent Sleep Disorder?

      It's called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, and about 1 percent of people over 50 who have a sleep study are diagnosed with it. More...

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